Apr 16

How to expand a VMDK and extend a partition in Windows for VMware ESX

http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1007266 This video steps you through expanding a VMDK and extending a partition using DiskPart. Essentially, this allows for expanding the virtual disk for virtual machines in VMware ESX.
Check out Amazon’s selection of books on VMware: http://amzn.to/2pZInmt

Rating: 5/5


Nov 21

How to backup and restore the embedded vCenter Server 6.0 vPostgres database

Posted on October 18, 2016 by Ramesh B S

This video demonstrates how to backup and restore an embedded vCenter Server 6.0 vPostgres database. Backing up your database protects the data stored in your database. Of course, restoring a backup is an essential part of that function.

This follows up on our recent blog & video: How to backup and restore the embedded vCenter Server Appliance 6.0 vPostgres database.

Note: This video is only supported for backup and restore of the vPostgres database to the same vCenter Server. Use of image-based backup and restore is the only solution supported for performing a full, secondary appliance restore.

Rating: 5/5


Oct 22

How to recreate a missing virtual machine disk descriptor file

http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1002511

This video demonstrates how to recreate a missing virtual machine disk descriptor .vmdk file.

Note: VMware recommends to attempt to restore the missing descriptor file from backups if possible. If this is not possible, proceed with recreating the virtual machine disk descriptor file.

To create a virtual machine disk descriptor file:

– Identify the size of the flat file in bytes.

– Create a new blank virtual disk that is the same size as the original. This serves as a baseline example that is modified in later steps.

– Rename the descriptor file (also referred to as a header file) of the newly-created disk to match the name of the original virtual disk.

– Modify the contents of the renamed descriptor file to reference the flat file.

– Remove the leftover temporary flat file of the newly-created disk, as it is not required.

This procedure will not work on virtual disks configured with a Para-virtualized SCSI controller in the virtual machine

For additional information, see VMware Knowledge Base article 1002511 at the following URL https://kb.vmware.com/kb/1002511

Rating: 5/5


Oct 14

Troubleshooting Virtual SAN on-disk format upgrade to 3.0 failures

Posted on October 13, 2016 by Ramesh B S

This video demonstrates how to troubleshoot Virtual SAN on-disk format upgrade to 3.0, which may fail in small Virtual SAN clusters or ROBO/stretched clusters.

Attempting an on-disk upgrade in certain VSAN configurations may result in failure. Configurations that can cause these errors include:

  • The stretched VSAN Cluster consists of two ESXi Hosts and the Witness Node (ROBO configuration)
  • Each Host in the Stretched Cluster contains a single VSAN Disk Group
  • A Virtual SAN cluster consists of three normal nodes, with one disk group per node
  • A Virtual SAN cluster is very full, preventing the “full data migration” disk-group decommission mode

To allow an upgrade to proceed in these configurations, a compromise as to availability must be made. Data accessibility will be maintained, but the redundant copy of the data will be lost and rebuilt during the upgrade process. As a result, data will be exposed to faults and failures such as the loss of a disk on another node may result in data loss. This exposure to additional failure risk is referred to as “reduced redundancy,” and must be manually specified in the Ruby vSphere Console (RVC) to allow the upgrade to proceed. It is not possible to specify reduced redundancy when using the vSphere Web Client to start the upgrade.

Caution: During upgrade, a single point of failure is exposed. Follow all VMware best practices, and your business practices, regarding the backup of important data and virtual machines.

https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2144944

This video demonstrates how to troubleshoot Virtual SAN on-disk format upgrade to 3.0, which may fail in small Virtual SAN clusters or ROBO/stretched clusters.

Attempting an on-disk upgrade in certain VSAN configurations may result in failure. Configurations that can cause these errors are:
– The stretched VSAN Cluster consists of two ESXi Hosts and the Witness Node also called ROBO configuration
– Each Host in the Stretched Cluster contains a single VSAN Disk Group
– A Virtual SAN cluster consists of three normal nodes, with one disk group per node
– A Virtual SAN cluster is very full, preventing the full data migration disk-group decommission mode

During this upgrade, a single point of failure is exposed. Follow all VMware best practices, and your business practices, regarding the backup of important data and virtual machines.

This exposure to additional failure risk is referred to as “reduced redundancy,” and must be manually specified in the Ruby vSphere Console or RVC to allow the upgrade to proceed.

Rating: 5/5


Jun 02

RUSH POST: Microsoft Convenience Update and VMware VMXNet3 Incompatibilities

Introduction

Posted on June 1, 2016 by Deji

Microsoft recently released a “Convenience Update” patch for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. This update has incompatibility issues with virtual machines running on the VMware vSphere virtualization platform. This incompatibility is confined to one specific configuration scenario – It impacts VMs that use the VMware VMXNet3 virtual network adapter type.

Here is the incompatibility issue as described in Microsoft’s announcement of the Update:

Known issue 1 in this convenience rollup

Symptoms

A new Ethernet vNIC may be created with default settings in place of the previously existing vNIC, causing network issues. Any custom settings on the previous vNIC are still persisted in the registry but unused.

Resolution

To resolve this issue, uninstall the convenience rollup.

Status

Microsoft is investigating this issue to determine proper course of action with VMWare. To resolve this issue uninstall the convenience rollup. Further information will be posted here as the investigation continues.

Known issue 2

Symptoms

After you install this rollup, virtualized applications in Microsoft Application Virtualization (App-V) versions 4.5, 4.6, and 5.0 may have problems loading. When these problems occur, you may receive an error message that resembles the following:
Launching MyApp 100%

Note In this error message, MyApp represents the name of the App-V application.

Depending on the scenario, the virtualized app may freeze after it starts, or the app may not start at all.

Important This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322756 How to back up and restore the registry in Windows.

Resolution

To fix this known issue, configure the TermSrvReadyEvent registry entry on the computer on which the Microsoft Application Virtualization Client is installed.

For Microsoft Application Virtualization 5.0

Registry Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\AppV\Subsystem\ObjExclusions
Value name: 93 (or any unique value)
Type: REG_SZ
Data: TermSrvReadyEvent

Example
For example, type the following command at an elevated command prompt to add the entry to a system that is running Application Virtualization 5.0:
reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\AppV\Subsystem\ObjExclusions /v 93 /t REG_SZ /d TermSrvReadyEvent

For Microsoft Application Virtualization 4.6

For all supported x86-based systems

Registry Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SoftGrid\4.5\SystemGuard\ObjExclusions
Value name: 95 (or any unique value)
Type: REG_SZ
Data: TermSrvReadyEvent

Example
For example, type the following command at an elevated command prompt to add the entry to an x86-based system that is running Application Virtualization 4.6:
reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SoftGrid\4.5\SystemGuard\ObjExclusions /v 95 /t REG_SZ /d TermSrvReadyEvent
For all supported x64-based systems

Registry Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\SoftGrid\4.5\SystemGuard\ObjExclusions
Value name: 95 (or any unique value)
Type: REG_SZ
Data: TermSrvReadyEvent

Example
For example, type the following command at an elevated command prompt to add the entry to an x64-based system that is running Application Virtualization 4.6:
reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\SoftGrid\4.5\SystemGuard\ObjExclusions /v 95 /t REG_SZ /d TermSrvReadyEvent

Rating: 5/5


May 22

Common vCenter Server Tasks in the vSphere Web Client Part 2

https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2145397

This video tutorial demonstrates how to perform some common tasks in VMware vCenter Server using the vSphere Web Client.

The tasks covered in this video are:

– Creating a virtual machine
– Powering on a virtual machine
– vMotioning a virtual machine
– Editing or changing the virtual machine settings
– Storage vMotioning a virtual machine

This video tutorial is aimed at VMware users who are new to the vSphere Web Client.

Rating: 5/5


May 22

Common vCenter Server Tasks in the vSphere Web Client Part 1

https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2145397

This video demonstrates how to perform the following common VMware vCenter Server tasks using the vSphere Web Client.

– Creating a Datacenter
– Creating a Cluster
– Adding an ESXi host
– Licensing an ESXi host

This vmware video tutorial is aimed at vSphere users who are new to the vSphere Web Client.

Rating: 5/5


May 11

End of General Support for vSphere 5.0 and vSphere 5.1 (KB: 2145103)

Purpose

This article provides information on the End of Support Life for vSphere 5.0 and vSphere 5.1, which includes vSphere Hypervisor ESXi 5.0 and 5.1 and vCenter Server 5.0 and 5.1 respectively.

Resolution

The End of General Support for vSphere 5.0 and vSphere 5.1 is August 24, 2016. To maintain your full level of support and subscription, you will need to upgrade to a supported version of vSphere. For more information on the benefits of upgrading and how to upgrade, visit the VMware vSphere Upgrade Center.

If you would like assistance in moving to a newer version of vSphere, VMware’s vSphere Upgrade Service is available. This service delivers a comprehensive guide to upgrading your virtual infrastructure. It includes recommendations for planning and testing the upgrade, the actual upgrade itself, validation guidance and rollback procedures. For more information contact your Technical Account Manager or visit VMware Professional Services.

In the event you are unable to upgrade before the End of General Support (EOGS) and are active on Support and Subscription, you have the option to purchase extended support in one year increments for up to two years beyond the EOGS date. The price of Extended Support is $300,000 per product per year. Visit VMware Extended Support for more information.

Technical Guidance is available until August 24, 2018 primarily through the self-help portal. During the Technical Guidance phase, VMware does not offer new hardware support, server/client/guest OS updates, new security patches or bug fixes unless otherwise noted. For more information, visit VMware Lifecycle Support Phases.

Related Education

http://www.vmware.com/support.html
http://www.vmware360.com/files/pdf/products/vsphere/Product-Lifecycle-Matrix.pdf
http://www.vmware.com/consulting/
http://www.vmware360.com/files/pdf/products/vsphere/extended_support.pdf

Request a Product Feature

To request a new product feature or to provide feedback on a VMware product, please visit the Request a Product Feature page.

Download

Download a full VMware Technical Support Welcome Guide.

Rating: 5/5


May 26

Installing and configuring the NVIDIA VIB on ESXi (KB: 2033434)

Details

Before you can use the hardware-based (GPU) virtual Shared Graphics Acceleration (vSGA) feature in vSphere, you must install and configure the NVIDIA GPU VIB (vSphere Installation Bundle) on ESXi.

This feature is supported in Horizon View 5.2 and later releases.

Note: This vSphere 5.1 feature is not supported in Horizon View 5.1 or earlier.

Solution

Installing the NVIDIA GPU VIB

To install the NVIDIA GPU VIB:

  1. Download the VIB from the NVIDIA web site: 

    Note: The preceding link was correct as of December 30, 2013. If you find the link is broken, provide feedback and a VMware employee will update the link.

  2. Open a command prompt on the ESXi host and run the command:

    esxcli software vib install -v /path_to_vib/nvidia_vib

Alternatively, you can use ESXi Image Builder to create a bootable image that contains the NVIDIA VIB. For more information, see the vSphere Installation and Setup Guide in the VMware vSphere 5.1 Documentation Center.

Starting the xorg Service

Before you start any virtual machines, make sure that the xorg service is running.

To verify that the xorg service is running using the vSphere Client:

  1. Connect to the ESXi host.
  2. On the Configuration tab under Software, click Security Profile.
  3. Click the Properties link for Services.
  4. Ensure that xorg is Running and has the startup policy you prefer. If xorg is Stopped:
    1. Select xorg and click Options.
    2. Click Start.
    3. Select the Startup Policy and click OK.

Note: To verify that the xorg service is running using the vSphere Web Client:

  1. Connect to vCenter Server.
  2. From the inventory, select the ESXi host.
  3. On the Manage tab under System, click Security Profile.
  4. Click the Edit button for Services.
  5. Ensure that xorg is Running and has your desired startup policy. If xorg is Stopped:
    1. Select xorg and click Start.
    2. Select the Startup Policy and click OK.

To verify that the xorg service is running using the command line:

  • From a command prompt on the ESXi host, run the command:

    /etc/init.d/xorg start

Configuring virtual machine video card 3D capabilities

To configure virtual machine video card 3D capabilities using the vSphere Client:

  1. Connect to the ESXi host.
  2. Select the virtual machine.
  3. On the Summary tab under Commands, click Edit Settings.
  4. Under Hardware, click Video card.
  5. Under Displays and video memory, set the video card 3D capabilities:
    1. Set the Total video memory to a value from 64 MB to 512 MB.

      Most applications should work with 128 MB. Video memory values larger than 128 MB are available only with virtual machines with hardware version 9.

    2. Under 3D graphics, select Enable 3D Support.
    3. Click OK.

Note: You cannot set the 3D renderer from the vSphere Client. Enabling 3D support is sufficient to use the hardware-based (GPU) virtual Shared Graphics Acceleration (vSGA) feature in vSphere. To set the 3D renderer, use the vSphere Web Client to configure video card 3D capabilities.

To set the 3D renderer from the vSphere Web Client:

  1. Connect to vCenter Server.
  2. Select the virtual machine:
    1. Click a data center, folder, cluster, resource pool, or host.
    2. Click the Related Objects tab, then click Virtual Machines.

  3. On the Manage tab, click Settings.
  4. Click VM Hardware.
  5. Click Edit.
  6. Expand the Video card setting.
  7. Set the Total video memory to a value from 64 MB to 512 MB.

    Most applications should work with 128 MB. Video memory values larger than 128 MB are available only with virtual machines with hardware version 9.

  8. For 3D Graphics, select Enable 3D Support.
  9. For 3D Renderer, select Hardware or Automatic.
  10. Click OK.

To configure virtual machine video card 3D capabilities from View Administrator:

Note: Hardware-based 3D rendering can be configured from View Administrator in Horizon View 5.2 and later releases.

  1. Connect to VMware View Administrator.
  2. Add or edit a desktop pool. For more information, see the VMware Horizon View Administration guide.
  3. On the Pool Settings page (or tab), set the 3D Renderer to Automatic or Hardware.
  4. Complete the Add Pool wizard or click OK in the Edit Pool dialog.

Note: If you use the Manage using vSphere Client option in View Administrator, you can configure 3D rendering from the vSphere Web Client on a per-virtual machine basis. If Manage using vSphere Client is not selected in View Administrator, the 3D rendering settings you make in View Administrator apply to the entire pool and overwrite any 3D rendering settings you make in the vSphere Web Client.

Uninstalling and updating the NVIDIA GPU VIB

To update the NVIDIA GPU VIB, you must uninstall the currently installed VIB and install the new VIB.

To uninstall the currently installed VIB:

  1. Stop all virtual machines using 3D acceleration.
  2. Place the ESXi host into Maintenance mode.
  3. Open a command prompt on the ESXi host.
  4. Stop the xorg service by running the command:

    /etc/init.d/xorg stop

  5. Remove the NVIDIA VMkernel driver by running the command:

    vmkload_mod -u nvidia

  6. Remove the VIB by running the command:

    esxcli software vib remove -n NVIDIA-VMware

    You can now install a newer NVIDIA GPU VIB by following the steps provided earlier in this article.


May 25

Uploading diagnostic information for VMware through the Secure FTP portal (KB: 2069559)

Purpose

To address a Support Request, VMware technical support requests diagnostic information from the VMware products.
 
This article provides procedures to upload diagnostic information to VMware using the Secure FTP (sftpsite.vmware.com) portal.
 
Note: To upload diagnostic information using FTP, see Uploading diagnostic information for VMware using FTP (2070100).

Resolution

Rating: 5/5

Uploading diagnostic information to VMware using the Secure FTP portal includes these methods:
Notes:
  • Internet Explorer 9 and above is supported.
  • Other supported browsers include Firefox, Chrome, and Safari.
  • When uploading with Internet Explorer 10/11, you may have to switch to compatibility mode.

  • Do not use the HTML interface to upload files larger than 2 GB.

  • Directory listing of file uploaded is disabled due to security reasons.
  • Files are not visible after the upload completes.

Uploading files to the Secure FTP portal using HTML Interface

To upload files via the sftpsite.vmware.com portal using your web browser:
  1. Go to https://sftpsite.vmware.com/.
  2. Enter this information:

    Username: inbound
    Password: inbound

    Note: Use AD account username and password to log in within the VMware network. inbound only works externally and not on VMware network.

  3. Select the HTML option.
  4. Click Login.

    Note: You can see that the directory listing is disabled for security purposes.

  5. Click New Directory.
  6. Enter your Support Request number in the field and click OK. If you receive an error that the file already exists, proceed to the next step.

    Note: The directory name must be the 11-digit SR number. If you enter an incorrect SR number, you see the error:

    Invalid Directory Name.Directory must be 11 Digit SR Number

  7. Click Change Directory.
  8. Click Add.
  9. Select the files you want to upload to VMware Support.
  10. Click Open.

    Note: The files that are uploaded must be less than2 GB.

  11. Click Upload.

    You are notified when the upload completes.

  12. Notify the Technical Support Engineer that the logs have been uploaded:

    1. Send an email to webform@vmware.com.
    2. Ensure that the subject line contains:

      VMware Support Request SR# YOUR_SUPPORT_REQUEST_NUMBER

Click here to open an email with the necessary fields populated. Replace YOUR_SUPPORT_REQUEST_NUMBERin the subject line with your Support Request number. Alternatively, you can update the support request through My VMware with a note indicating you have uploaded files via sftpsite.vmware.com.  

Uploading files to the Secure FTP portal using Java Applet Interface

You can use the Secure FTP portal Java Applet to upload files using your web browser. The Java Applet allows you to transfer files greater than 2 GB.
 
Note: To be able to access the Java Applet interface, you must use Java 1.7 or later.

To upload files using the Java Applet:

  1. Browse to the http://sftpsite.vmware.com/ or https://sftpsite.vmware.com/ URL.
  2. In the Login page, select the Java Applet user interface option.
  3. Enter this information:

    Username: inbound
    Password: inbound

  4. Right-click the Remote System pane and click mkdir. Skip this step if the SR directory already exists.
  5. Enter your SR number as the directory name.

    Notes:

    • Ensure to enter a valid 11 digit SR number as the directory name.
    • Ensure that the directory name does not contain any special characters, such as space, “, “ , # , or $.

  6. In the Remote pane, enter the SR directory name you created.
  7. In the Local System pane, browse to the location of files that are to be uploaded.
  8. Select the file(s) to be uploaded.
  9. Right-click the files to be uploaded and click Upload.

    You are notified when the upload completes.

Uploading files to the Secure FTP portal from a Linux operating system

You can upload files directly to the sftpsite.vmware.com site from a Linux operating system, provided you have the firewall rules open to allow access directly from virtual machines to the Secure FTP site.

Notes:

  • You can use this method to upload files greater than 2 GB.
  • Ensure that you have your Support Request number. This number is provided to you when a Support Request is created.
  • After uploading the diagnostic data, you cannot see the file listing on the server because the directory listing is disabled for security reasons.

To upload files to the sftpsite.vmware.com portal from the command line:

  1. Launch the terminal session from the virtual machine.
  2. Change directory to the location where you have the files to be uploaded.
  3. Enter this command:

    sftp inbound@sftpsite.vmware.com

    After you are connected to sftpsite.vmware.com, you see the message:

    VMware Secure FTP Server :- Directory Name must be 11 Digit SR Number

  4. Enter the password ( inbound) to log in.
  5. To upload files for a new SR, create the SR directory using the mkdir command (if the SR directory does not exist already):

    mkdir SR#

    For example:

    mkdir 12345678901

  6. Change to the SR directory using this command:

    cd SR#

    For example:

    cd 12345678901

  7. Enter this command to upload the file:

    put file_name

    Note: To upload multiple files, you can use the mput command.

Uploading files to the Secure FTP portal using third-party clients

You can use third-party clients, such as FileZila, to upload files to the SFTP clients.

To upload files to the sftpsite.vmware.com portal using FileZilla:

  1. Open the FileZilla client.
  2. Click Transfer > Transfer type > Binary to set the transfer mode to binary.
  3. Click File > Site Manager.
  4. Add the VMware FTP site to My Sites using the Site Manager. The credentials are:

    Address – sftpsite.vmware.com
    Port – 22
    Protocol – SFTP – SSH File Transfer Protocol
    Logon Type – normal
    User – inbound
    Password – inbound

  5. Click Connect.
  6. Right-click the Remote Site pane and click Create Directory. Skip this step if the SR directory already exists.
  7. Change directory to newly created SR directory.
  8. After connecting to the correct destination directory, browse to the location of the log files on your local system using the file browser in the left pane or enter the full path in the Local site field.
  9. Right-click the file and click Upload.
  10. Monitor the transfer progress in the Queued files pane.

See Also